Archive for September, 2010

Join us for Middle-Eastern dinner and discussion


Please come and join Sunday, October 17th for a stimulating and convivial Middle-Eastern lecture and dinner. This event is being underwritten by the Brown Club of Oregon and the Brown Alumni Association to keep the cost at $15 per person, including an authentic 8-course Middle-Eastern dinner and drinks.

Space is limited to 20 participants on a first-come basis. Please see details below.

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Archaeology at a Wonder of the World: Brown at Petra 2010

Brown archaeologists have been working for decades at the ‘rose-red’ city of Petra in southern Jordan, a site recently voted a modern ‘Wonder of the World’. But many questions still remain about just how this place came to be, and how people lived and worked within it. In 2010, the Brown team dug, walked, mapped, and analyzed everything from Paleolithic stone tools to present-day garbage, in a new attempt to understand the mystery that is Petra.

Sunday, October 17
6:00 - 9:00 pm
Nicholas Restaurant - Arabian Breeze Banquet Room
3223 NE Broadway Portland
8-course Middle-Easter dinner with beer and wine
Only $15 per person
Register Here by Sunday October 10

Featuring Professor Susan Alcock
Director, Artemis A.W. and Martha Sharp Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Family Professor in Archaeology Professor of Classics

Sue Alcock is a classical archaeologist, with interests in the material culture of the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia, particularly in Hellenistic and Roman times. Much of her research to date has revolved around themes of landscape, imperialism, sacred space, and memory. Her fieldwork has, until recently, taken the form of regional investigations in Greece, but she is now involved with the Vorotan Project, an international collaborative effort in southern Armenia.

Sue Alcock was trained, at Yale and at the University of Cambridge, in the field of classical archaeology — that is the archaeology of the circum-Mediterranean world. Her research interests chiefly target the material culture of the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia, particularly in Hellenistic and Roman times. She has also worked on the long-term history of Messenia (southern Greece), the homeland of the famed ‘helots’ of antiquity. Much of her research to date has revolved around themes of landscape, imperialism, sacred space, and memory. Her work attempts to straddle the usual divide of ‘historian’ and ‘archaeologist.’